free web hosting | free hosting | Business Hosting | Free Website Submission | shopping cart | php hosting
Hi

Yesterday, I received the information about Samuel Bumpus I sent for at the National Archives in D.C... I didn't learn who his parents were but I may find them now in the 1860 census in Winchester, Randolph CO., IN.

Most of the paper work, which was a lot, pertained to the application for a widow's pension applied for in the behalf of Samuel's second wife Mary Amanda (Ballinger) Bumpus by her legal guardian who was appointed because she was too "weak of body and mind". Included were many depositions from family members, doctors, fellow soldiers, friends, etc. that give a lot of information. I spent the afternoon going through it and need to spend a lot more but I now have a much different picture of Samuel Bumpus and his life from the time he entered the Union army to when he died in 1885. I also have more information about much of his family. I'll outline what I remember of it now to give you an idea of Samuel's life but keep in mind it is mostly by memory. I'll be more thorough later.

Before the civil war, Samuel Bumpus was a friendly, well- liked, hard working young house carpenter, was a husky 5' 8, fair complexion with hazel eyes. He joined the 8th Indiana Infantry Volunteers on Sept. 5, 1861 at Indianapolis Indiana in Oct. that year. On the march to Missouri, he was hospitalized, in Missouri, with measles for 2 or 3 months. He was never well after that and continued to deteriorate until he died in Aug., 1885.

He was hospitalized several times while in the army for chronic diarrhea, fever and "poisoned leg" (he was shot in the left leg below the knee at the battle of Vicksburg) and never talked much above a whisper after he had the measles. One doctor diagnosed him with syphilis. Some of the other men in the same outfit had the same voice problem. He was transferred to the Invalid Corp Oct. 7, 1863 He mustered out in Missouri and "returned to Winchester Indiana".

Samuel moved to Missouri in 1868 and worked for Dimmick Lattin on his farm. In 1869 he married Catherine "Kati" Isabelle Lattin. They had a son, George James, b. June23, 1870 and a daughter, Clara Amanda b. Aug. 7 1873. (Dimmick died in 1782).

Samuel and Kati went to Humboldt Kansas in about 1874 and Katherine died there at the home of her older sister, Amanda Long, "in 1875 or early 76". Samuel left the children and Mrs Long gave them to the Allen County officials who in turn gave then to Jack Thompson of the same county. Clara only saw her father one time after her mother died.

Samuel returned to Carthage, Missouri and worked on a farm for a while where he met Mary Amanda Ballinger, also working there. They both entered the Poor Farm in Carthage and were there in 1880. They married in 1881. Mary Amanda said they married about three months after they met but all indications are that she was not mentally capable of determining such things. Samuel would occasionally leave the Poor Farm for work without Mary Amanda. She said he would return to see her at least once a month and he was occasionally readmitted to the Poor Farm. They had two daughters, Lilly May, June 8, 1883 and Cora Lee, July 31, 1885, just one week before Samuel died. Samuel and Mary were allowed to live on the farm of the Poor Farm superintendent for about the last year of his life: I think for free.

The people who knew Samuel in Missouri described him as frail, weak, sick most of the time and only talked in a whisper. Samuel deteriorated to the point where he was not able to work much and couldn't make a living before he died. He had a small pension from the army but that barely covered the doctor bills. He died in Aug. 1885 and Mary Amanda moved back to the poor farm soon after. She gave up her children for adoption in about 1887. She was described as too weak of body and mind to earn a living. She died in 1912. (She must have been 66.)

Most of the paper work, which was a lot, pertained to the application for a widow's pension applied for in the behalf of Samuel's second wife Mary Amanda (Ballinger) Bumpus by her legal guardian who was appointed because she was too "weak of body and mind". Included were many depositions from family members, doctors, fellow soldiers, friends, etc. that give a lot of information. I spent the afternoon going through it and need to spend a lot more but I now have a much different picture of Samuel Bumpus and his life from the time he entered the Union army to when he died in 1885. I also have more information about much of his family. I'll outline what I remember of it now to give you an idea of Samuel's life...but keep in mind it is mostly by memory. I'll be more thorough later.

Samuel moved to Missouri in 1868 and worked for Dimmick Lattin on his farm. In 1869 he married Catherine "Kati"Isabelle Lattin. They had a son, George James b. June23, 1870 and a daughter, Clara Amanda b. Aug. 7 1873. (Dimmick died in 1782) Samuel and Kati went to Humboldt Kansas in about 1874 and Katherine died there at the home of her older sister, Amanda Long, "in 1875 or early 76". Samuel left the children and Mrs Long gave them to the Allen County officials who in turn gave then to Jack Thompson of the same county. Clara only saw her father one time after her mother died.

The people that knew Samuel in Missouri described him as frail, week, sick most of the time and only talked in a whisper. Samuel deteriorated to the point that he was not able to work much and couldn't make a living before he died. He had a small pension from the army but that barely covered the doctor bills. He died in Aug. 1885 and Mary Amanda moved back to the poor farm soon after. She gave up her children for adoption in about 1887. She was described as too week of body and mind to earn a living. She died in 1912. (She must have been 66.)

Back to Mail